Sisters of Mercy celebrate first patient

Bishop Edward M. Rice recently celebrated with Mercy Springfield and the Sisters of Mercy on their 125th anniversary of serving the first patient for Mercy health. To follow is his homily on the historical occasion:

MERCY SPRINGFIELD—Mercy Springfield closed its year-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the first patient served by the Sisters of Mercy in southwest Missouri. Pictured Nov. 9 were (front) Sr. Margaret Andrews, Sr. Carmen Gonzalez, Sr. Elizabeth Bui-Thi-Nghia, Sr. Liz Koehler and Fr. Jerome Amaechi; (back row) Sr. Seraphia Matova, Sr. Rudolphia Petrikova, Sr. Chabanel Finnegan, Bp. Edward M. Rice, Sr. Richard Mary Burke, Sr. Mary Dorothy Calhoun, and Sr. Cecilia Bergschneide. (The Mirror)
MERCY SPRINGFIELD—Mercy Springfield closed its year-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the first patient served by the Sisters of Mercy in southwest Missouri. Pictured Nov. 9 were (front) Sr. Margaret Andrews, Sr. Carmen Gonzalez, Sr. Elizabeth Bui-Thi-Nghia, Sr. Liz Koehler and Fr. Jerome Amaechi; (back row) Sr. Seraphia Matova, Sr. Rudolphia Petrikova, Sr. Chabanel Finnegan, Bp. Edward M. Rice, Sr. Richard Mary Burke, Sr. Mary Dorothy Calhoun, and Sr. Cecilia Bergschneide. (The Mirror)

Mercy Hospital
125th Anniversary
Feast of the Dedication of St. John Lateran

Today’s celebration of the 125th Anniversary of Mercy Hospital coincides with the liturgical Feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica in Rome.

St. John Lateran is the cathedral for the bishop of Rome. As Pope, he has St. Peter’s. But as a bishop he has the Lateran. And it is referred to as the Mother Church, the Head of all Churches in the city of Rome itself and throughout the world. As such, in remembering its dedication, it is a sign of love and unity for the Holy Father and his role in the Church.

The first reading, from Revelations, describes the life-giving waters flowing from the foundation of the temple. Of course, we can make the immediate analogy of the waters of baptism, flowing from the Church. And St. Paul’s letter to the Corinthians takes that image of a building and applies it to the People of God. “You are God’s building,” with Christ as the foundation. We can recall the words of the prophet, “Unless the Lord build the house in vain do we labor.” Paul challenges us to be living temples. And, just as we expect the church to be a place of holiness and prayer, so too each of us.

Enlivened with the Spirit we are called to be living stones, building up the temple. In our work, in our thoughts, words and actions we are to reflect the glory of lives pleasing to God. This institution has had many transformations over the past 125 years. As the needs grew, so did this institution. As advances were made, so too the expertise and professionalism of Mercy Hospital. And we can only speculate as to the advances in the medical field in the years to come. But, what should always be the foundation of this hospital is, as a reporter stated in 1891, “the ambitious cause of charity,” divine love.

This institution, similar to Mercy Joplin and Mercy St. Francis in Mt. View, is often the first and only encounter people have with the Catholic Church. You as an institution have a grave responsibility to convey the love of Christ, His healing love. To fail in this endeavor would be a failure of mercy.

Each of you has a role to play. Each of you is a living stone of this institution. It would be impossible for us to count the number of bricks used to build this medical center. And we really do not need to know. Because what is more important is the role that each of you plays in building up and continuing the mission of Mercy. When it comes to mercy and charity, every one of you contributes to the mission. In doing so you build up the Church! And as we come to the end of the Year of Mercy initiated on December 8 of last year, let us always remember that “mercy never ends.”

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The Catholic Center’s #1 Cubs fan all smiles

The Catholic Center staff and Bishop Edward M. Rice held an impromptu celebration Nov. 3 for Msgr. Thomas E. Reidy, diocesan chancellor and vicar general. The Chicago native’s beloved home team won a hard-fought battle against the Cleveland Indians to be the 2016 World Series champs. Cake, party poppers, and the singing of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” rounded out the Thursday afternoon party.

“We thought we better have something,” said Bishop Rice. “It may be another 100 years or so before the Cubs do this again!”

In addition to his many diocesan responsibilities, Msgr. Reidy is pastor of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Springfield, and St. Francis of Assisi Parish, Nixa.

 

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Senior party held at St. Agnes Cathedral

CARE MINISTRY AT CATHEDRAL—Around 70 parishioners attended a catered luncheon and celebration held on Oct. 28 at St. Agnes Cathedral Parish. The event was organized to honor and recognize parishioners who are ages 90-100, and included musical entertainment of singing rag-time tunes and sounds from the big band era. Pictured were (front Mike McElhaney, Rose Mae Arnold, Dorothy Gilcrease, Hilda Glore, Mary Roberts, Lois Ruzicka, Ernie Ruzicka, Agnes McLean, and Joe Fortier; (back) Dorothy Kennon, Fr. Lewis Hejna, pastor; Agnes Wagstaff, Sr. Elizabeth Ann Weiler, ASC, pastoral minister; Joan Bean, and Anna Coleman. (Submitted photo)
CARE MINISTRY AT CATHEDRAL—Around 70 parishioners attended a catered luncheon and celebration held on Oct. 28 at St. Agnes Cathedral Parish. The event was organized to honor and recognize parishioners who are ages 90-100, and included musical entertainment of singing rag-time tunes and sounds from the big band era. Pictured were (front Mike McElhaney, Rose Mae Arnold, Dorothy Gilcrease, Hilda Glore, Mary Roberts, Lois Ruzicka, Ernie Ruzicka, Agnes McLean, and Joe Fortier; (back) Dorothy Kennon, Fr. Lewis Hejna, pastor; Agnes Wagstaff, Sr. Elizabeth Ann Weiler, ASC, pastoral minister; Joan Bean, and Anna Coleman. (Submitted photo)

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‘Boo fest’ held at St. Agnes School

THREE SCARY CHARACTERS—Pastor Fr. Lewis Hejna sported a cappello, which identified him as a priest from Rome; Bp. Edward M. Rice, and seminarian Josh Carroll dressed as “a priest” for the annual Boo Fest Fri., Oct. 21, held at St. Agnes Catholic School, Springfield. Someone at the Boo Fest commented to Bp. Rice, “I like your bishop costume. It’s very realistic!” (Photo by Josh Carroll)
THREE SCARY CHARACTERS—Pastor Fr. Lewis Hejna sported a cappello, which identified him as a “priest from Rome;” Bp. Edward M. Rice, and seminarian Josh Carroll dressed as “a priest” for the annual Boo Fest Fri., Oct. 21, held at St. Agnes Catholic School, Springfield, where treats, inflatables, games, and other seasonal fare greeted the children. Someone commented to Bp. Rice, unaware that he is the Bishop of Springfield-Cape Girardeau, “I like your bishop costume. It’s very realistic!” (Photo by Josh Carroll)

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Pirate theme teaches lessons in maps & compasses

St. Joseph Catholic Academy kindergarten and first grade classes recently experienced learning with a Pirate theme.

The students made maps, learned how to find their way with the use of a compass, and enjoyed eating Pirate snacks.

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